The Definitive Stages Of Grief Every Grey’s Fan Experiences

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A guide to help you get through Thursday nights.

Picture the most heartbreaking moment on the show to date. No, don’t tell me what it is. You’re at the end of a season. Or you’re in the middle of a season. You know what? You could be in any part of any season and it could still happen. Tragedy strikes at Grey Sloan Memorial, and you’re left wondering how you’re going to survive an entire week without knowing what happens next.

When such things occur, and they often do, it’s important to recognize the stages of grief you’re going to go through as you move from week to week, season to season, and tragedy to tragedy.

Stage 1: Denial

How could this happen? How did I not see this coming? You’re in shock, like the rest of us, and you’re asking yourself how you’re going to go on with your life now that it basically has no meaning anymore. A part of your brain is telling you this can’t be happening, not to your beloved character. But denial is an essential part of the healing process, and it’s only the beginning of the rollercoaster ride that is Grey’s Anatomy.

Stage 2: Anger

Now you’re yelling through the TV in a hopeless attempt to page the doctors at Grey Sloan yourself. Why isn’t anyone coming to the rescue? Don’t they know something terrible is happening?! Your anger towards the other characters may seem irrational, but you now have something to hold onto (ie: a grudge) and your life suddenly has a purpose again.

Stage 3: Bargaining

Grey's Anatomy via ABC

What would you do to reverse a tragedy? You feel like you’d do anything to bring back a character that didn’t deserve the fate that was handed to them. You find yourself making a lot of statements that start with “What if…” In this stage, your feelings of anger might resurface, and that’s okay. Let it happen.

Stage 4: Depression

Once you realize that you can’t jump into the show or go back in time to un-see what you’ve just seen, you’re going to feel really sad. And maybe you’ll cycle through anger and bargaining again. Like I said, it’s a rollercoaster ride. Remember that at this point it’s perfectly fine to cry and pour yourself another glass of wine if you need it.

Stage 5: Acceptance & Hope

And finally, we reach the point of acceptance. As we wipe away our tears and face the reality of the situation, it’s important that we remain hopeful for the doctors at Grey Sloan Memorial. They’ll certainly pick up the pieces from the tragedy; we should do the same in our own hearts, and prepare for another wild ride of emotions.

Repeat on Thursdays as needed.


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