Miss Peru Contestants Share Gender-Violence Stats Instead Of Bra Sizes

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Sisters are doing it for themselves.

Pageantry

Beauty pageants have come under scrutiny in the past few years. Women parading around in their swimsuits only to be judged by a panel. It seems archaic and sexist, but some winners are granted opportunities and scholarships.

Miss Peru

In Peru, the contestants weren’t following protocol. Instead of responding with their body measurements, as they had done in the past, the ladies did something different. Each contestant used their platform to discuss women’s rights and gender violence. They listed statistics from their hometowns instead of their bra size. Below are some translated statements from the contestants:

“I represent the constitutional province of Callaomy and my measurements are: 3,114 women victims of trafficking up until 2014. Said the eventual winner, Romina Lozano.

“My name is Camila Canicoba and I represent the department of Lima. My measurements are: 2,202 cases of femicide reported in the last night years in my country”.

“My name is Juana Acevedo and my measurements are: more than 70% of women in our country are victims of street harassment”.

“My name is Luciana Fernandez and I represent the city of Huánuco and my measurements are: 13,000 girls suffer sexual abuse in our country”.

“My name isMelina Machuca, I represent the department of Cajamarca, and my measurements are: more than 80% of women in my city suffer from violence.”

“Almendra Marroquín here. I represent Cañete and my measurements are: more than 25% of girls and teenagers are abused in their schools.”

“My name is Bélgica Guerra and I represent Chincha. My measurements are: the 65% of university women who are assaulted by their partners.”

“My name is Romina Lozano and I represent the constitutional province of Callao, and my measurements are: 3,114 women victims of trafficking up until 2014.”

Ask Them More

Later, the women were asked what government changes they’d want to see to combat gender violence. The contestants took control of their platform and dictated information more important than their hip to waist ratio. Maybe other beauty competitions will follow.