When Is The Next Full Solar Eclipse After 2017? The Next Total Eclipse...

When Is The Next Full Solar Eclipse After 2017? The Next Total Eclipse
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Find out! When Is The Next Full Solar Eclipse After 2017? The Next Total Eclipse...

When Is The Next Full Solar Eclipse After 2017? The Next Total Eclipse:

If you're wondering when is the next full solar eclipse after 2017?, you're not alone. Many star gazers and astronomy fans looking to see the total eclipse this 2017 are wondering the very same thing. So if you're wondering if you should skip the total solar eclipse this 2017 than that really depends on how long you're willing to wait to see the next one!

Monday, August 21st the moon will cast a shadow that is 70 miles wide and slip between Earth and the sun creating quite a display back here on Earth.

Being called the “Great American Eclipse,” this coast to coast total solar eclipse is unlike any other we have seen in 99 years and is now being referred to as “one of the events of the century.”

The Next Full / Total Solar Eclipse Schedule After 2017:

If you miss this one, you'll have to wait until the next North American total solar eclipse in 2024. If you can manage to get yourself to South America you can view another total solar eclipse on July 2, 2019, again in South America on December 14, 2020, and then in Antarctica on December 4, 2021.

Map Of Both The 2017 And 2014 Total Solar Eclipse Paths:

nationaleclipse.wordpress.com

Where Can You See This Years Total Eclipse In August 2017?

People in parts of Africa, South America and Europe will be able to see the eclipse, along with those in the United States. The last time a total eclipse graced viewers in the United States was Feb. 26, 1979, Parade reported, and it was in a limited geographic area.

This time around, the eclipse will be arcing along a 3,000-mile path from Oregon’s Pacific coast to South Carolina’s shores. The “path of totality” will include Oregon, Idaho, Wyoming, Nebraska, Kansas, Missouri, Illinois, Kentucky, Tennessee, Georgia, North Carolina and South Carolina. Those in the path of totality will witness the moon completely blocking the sun and those outside of it will see a partial eclipse.

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